“What’s the worst that can happen?” – more musings on how we present ourselves to the world for Alopecia Awareness Month

In our previous post, we discussed how self-confidence is often strongly influenced by our perceptions about what others might think about us. This is an endlessly fascinating topic for me and Rachel because we often swing between feeling totally ourselves, ready to the face the world, through to crippling anxiety about what others will think, and back again.

In doing so, we are gradually learning strategies for staying more in the former space, and reducing time in the latter. But it is by no means a perfect science. We find ourselves testing the waters, dipping our toes into different ways of being to see what happens.

In this podcast episode for September’s Alopecia Awareness Month, we talk about my ‘summer experiment’, in which I decided to resist shaving my legs. Have a listen to see how I got on….

Rach and Liz Podcast #2

 

“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.”
~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

We very much hope you enjoy listening to our ramblings. If you have a moment to let us have any feedback (no matter how ‘constructive’!), that would really help us with any additional audio offerings.

Thank you, and until the next time…! 🙂

 

Show Notes

Here is the video about ‘elevator conformity’ that I mention during our conversation:

6 Comments

  1. Love hear you two talking. Regarding shaving legs, it was unknown when I grew up. Even as a teenager we did not even think about it. I only heard about it when I came to London and when my new friends got ready to go out they shaved their legs carefully. I never bothered for some time. Funny though I started later in life not regularly though as everybody seems to do it. ( Follow the crowd syndrome….) It does not seem to be something that important to me. ( I don’t do Make up either though) I do agree with- it does look nicer when you have a summer dress on. Now in the colder season I don’t bother much. I always thought it is something typically British. Funny really, and I cannot think of any German I know who does it. (It might be an age thing – not sure)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s so interesting, isn’t it. All the more reason not to get caught up in the ‘this is what everyone does’ stream of thinking! Great to have your comments as always, Ute, thanks so much xxx

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Fantastic subject for a podcast!
    Ute is right. All the German and Austrian friends I had when I was young never shaved, which I thought at the time was strange and quirkily foreign.
    Since becoming middle-aged and no longer at work I found that I no longer needed to shave as regularly as I used to do. (Other women can be quite nasty at times and I had no wish to be that different when I was young.) I wasn’t on show as before and had less cash to spend on beauty products. This was a sort of decision though it was a gradual thing, if you understand me. I love the feel of my legs when newly shaved and hate the feel of stubble but I live in trousers and Richard never seemed aware of this change in me. (I never spoke to him about this.) I am definitely post-menopausal and am considerably less hairy so I shave even less frequently these days. However…. my chin now sprouts whiskers which are pulled out as soon as possible. It would take a lot of courage to grow a beard and moustache!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Brilliant comments, Clare, thank you so much! I’m with you completely on the facial hair front. I am peri-menopausal, with all manner of changes going on – it will be interesting to see if there are any hair-related developments too as you have found. X

      Liked by 1 person

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